News & Events

June 02, 2016

For his pioneering research on plasticity, the brain’s remarkable capacity to modify its structure and function, UCSF's Michael M. Merzenich, PhD, has been awarded the 2016 Kavli Prize in Neuroscience.

May 27, 2016

UCSF’s neurosciences community gathered to celebrate the launch of the UCSF Weill Institute for Neurosciences, made possible by the recent $185 million gift from Joan and Sanford I. “Sandy” Weill.

May 02, 2016

A 27-year-old drug for anemia may protect newborns at high risk for brain damage, according to the results of a multisite trial led by researchers at UCSF.

April 27, 2016

Proper communication between the left and right sides of the brain is critical for the development of advanced language skills, according to new research by UC San Francisco scientists.

April 25, 2016

In the largest-ever gift to UCSF, the Weill Family Foundation and Joan and Sanford I. “Sandy” Weill have donated $185 million to establish the UCSF Weill Institute for Neurosciences.

April 25, 2016

UCSF leaders are lauding the gift by Joan and Sanford I. Weill as transformational, giving the University an unprecedented opportunity to unite and expand its neurosciences community during a revolutionary period in brain discovery.

April 25, 2016

With one drug to shut down its progression and another to undo its damage, plus a worldwide effort stalking the origins of multiple sclerosis, MS doesn’t stand a chance.

April 21, 2016

Frontotemporal dementia, the second most common cause of dementia in people under 65, may be triggered by a defect in immune cells called microglia that causes them to consume the brain’s synaptic connections, according to new research led by UCSF scientists.

April 20, 2016

UCSF neuroscientists Michael Brainard and John L.R. Rubenstein have been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

April 14, 2016

In a study of 10 children published online in the American Journal of Human Genetics on April 14, the researchers linked a constellation of birth defects affecting the brain, eye, ear, heart and kidney to mutations in a single gene, called RERE.

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